Toyota Dyna

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The Toyota Dyna is a medium-duty cab over truck for commercial use. In the Japanese market, the Dyna is sold alongside its twin called the Toyoace. The Toyoace was a renaming of the Toyopet SKB Truck as a result of a 1956 public competition with 200,000 entries.  “Dyna” is short for dynamic.

The Dyna was originally available in Japan only at Toyota Diesel Store locations, then later available at Toyota Store locations, while the Toyoace twin was available at Toyopet Store locations. The Dyna was also sold as the Japanese: Daihatsu Delta and the Hino Dutro.

In Japan, its traditional competitors are the Isuzu Elf, the Mitsubishi Fuso Canter and the Nissan Atlas.

The Toyota Dyna has a gross vehicle weight of up to 3.5-tonnes with a maximum payload of 1.5-tonnes and is available in both single cab and two cab configurations. Moreover, the Japanese LCV is also available as a dropside truck or in tipper form being suited to carry all sorts of loads. The Toyota Dyna has a starting price of 20.447 euro with service intervals set at 20,000 miles and a three-year/60,000-mile warranty.

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Toyota Van

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The Toyota Van MasterAce is a cab over vehicle that was produced by Toyota and distributed worldwide under several names, with “MasterAce” being the name used in Japan. In Japan, the MasterAce was sold only at Toyota Store locations. North American markets called it the Toyota Van (VanWagon in early press materials). In parts of Europe it was known as the Toyota Space Cruiser, while Australia referred to the vehicle as the Toyota Tarago (named after Tarago, New South Wales). In Germany, Sweden, Norway, China, and some countries of Latin America it was sold as the Toyota Model F.

The MasterAce was a slightly larger version of the Toyota LiteAce/TownAce.  It featured a sharply sloped front, in contrast to the upright flat found in the larger Toyota HiAce.  When introduced in November 1982, only the carbureted 1,812 cc 2Y petrol engine was available.  Most markets gained the option of the 1,974 cc 2C diesel engine in May 1983.  North American market sales started in 1983 with the fuel-injected 1,998 cc 3Y (87 hp/65 kW), which was later replaced with the 102 hp (76 kW) 2,237 cc 4Y engine for the 1986 model year. Much of the vehicle was borrowed from the Toyota Hilux, including suspension components.

The Toyota MasterAce was replaced with the production of the Toyota Previa in 1990.

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Toyota Tundra

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The Toyota Tundra is a full-size pickup truck manufactured in the US by the Japanese manufacturer Toyota since May 1999. The Tundra was eventually nominated for the North American Truck of the Year award and was Motor Trend Magazine’s Truck of the Year in 2000 and 2008. Currently the Tundra is assembled in San Antonio, Texas, USA where production was consolidated in 2008.

The first generation Tundra had many similarities with the older Toyota T100 and the compact Toyota Tacoma. The biggest of those similarities was the shared use of a 3.4-liter V6 engine which was the top of the line engine in both the Tacoma and T100. The V6 engine would serve as the base engine for the Tundra, while a second powerplant, a first for a Toyota truck, a V8 engine sized at 4.7-liters was added to the lineup.

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Toyota Tercel

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The Tercel is a subcompact manufactured by Toyota from 1978 to 2000 across five generations, in five body configurations sized between the Corolla and the Starlet.  Manufactured at the Takaoka Plant in Toyota City, Japan, and sharing its platform with the Cynos (aka Paseo) and the Starlet, the Tercel was marketed variously as the Corolla II—sold at Toyota Japanese dealerships called Toyota Corolla Stores—and was replaced by the Toyota Platz in 2000. It was also known as the (Japanese: Toyota Corsa) and sold at Toyopet Store locations.

The Tercel was the first front wheel drive vehicle produced by Toyota, establishing a layout and frame that was later used in popular Toyota models. For example, Toyota Corolla E80’s frame is almost similar to AL20 Tercel’s frame. Also, Toyota designed a new A engine for Tercel, attempting simultaneously to achieve good fuel economy and performance and low emissions. Choice of body styles increased as well, with the addition of a four-door sedan.

The name “Tercel” derives from the Latin word for “one third” as the Tercel was slightly smaller than the Corolla— much the way “tiercel” refers to a male falcon, which is one-third smaller than its female counterpart. All Tercels were assembled at the Takaoka factory in Toyota City, Aichi or by Hino Motors in Hamura, Tokyo. Hino assembled the third generation Tercel from 1987–1990 for the two–door and some three–door models.

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Toyota Tacoma

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The Toyota Tacoma is a pickup truck manufactured in the U.S. by the Japanese automobile manufacturer Toyota since 1995. The first generation Tacoma, model years 1995½ through 2004, was classified as a compact pickup. The second generation was classified as mid-size. The Tacoma was Motor Trend Magazine’s Truck of the Year for 2005.

The Tacoma was introduced in the US in 1995 as a replacement for the Hilux, which prior to this was marketed in the US under the name Toyota Pickup. Compared with the Hilux, the Tacoma is engineered with a greater priority on ride quality, handling, comfort, and safety over ruggedness and payload capacity. The design is intended to better suit the needs of the US and Canadian pickup truck market, where pickup trucks, particularly compact and mid-sized models, are often used as personal vehicles, and less exclusively for commercial, agricultural, and off road use.

There were a total of three engines available for the Toyota Tacoma:

  • 2.4 L four-cyclinderrated at 142 hp (106 kW) and 160 lb·ft (217 N·m) of torque
  • 2.7 L four-cylinder rated at 150 hp (112 kW) and 177 lb·ft (240 N·m) of torque
  • 3.4 L V6 rated at 190 hp (142 kW) and 220 lb·ft (298 N·m) of torque.

The 2.4 L gave a highly useful 29 miles per US gallon (8.1 L/100 km; 35 mpg-imp) (hwy), the 2.7 L gave 26 miles per US gallon (9.0 L/100 km; 31 mpg-imp) (hwy), and the 3.4 L delivered 22 miles per US gallon (11 L/100 km; 26 mpg-imp) (hwy).

Two-wheel drive Tacomas had 5-stud wheel lug patterns. The 2.4 L and 3.4 L engines were available in this vehicle depending on options. Automatic and manual transmissions were available.

Four-wheel drive Tacomas had six-stud wheel lug patterns, which had been used on the prior pickups (pre-Tacoma trucks). The truck’s frame is fully boxed until immediately after the front leaf spring mount bracket where it transitions into a c-frame section. The 3.4 V6’s manual transmission was an R150F while the automatic transmission was an A340F (Aisin code is 30-40LE). From 95-97 Single cab Tacomas had the option of a manual transmission with the 3.4 V6 engine. The factory supercharged 3.4L V6 produced 254 bhp (189 kW) and 270 lb·ft (366 N·m).  From 1998 on, the single cabs only got a 2.7 L or a 2.4 L four-cylinder from the factory. TRD packages started in 1998 (if the V6 engine was selected, a differential locker in the rear came with it).

Prerunner models started in 1998. They share the same front and rear suspension parts and geometry, frame, styling and engine options as the 4×4 Tacomas of this year range. Prerunner Tacomas also had the option of the TRD Off-Road package which (like the 4×4) got a rear differential locker if it was a V6 model (among other suspension variations). One downside is there was no option of a five-speed transmission.  The V6 Tacoma automatic transmissions were an A340E. Because of the similarities in the Prerunner and 4×4 models, it is possible to use stock parts to convert a Prerunner to a 4×4.

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Toyota T100

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The Toyota T100 (not to be confused with RK100) was a full-size pickup truck introduced by Toyota in late 1992 as a 1993 model year vehicle.

As Toyota firmly established itself in the North American compact pickup truck market in the 1980s through 1990s, it seemed only logical that Toyota needed to capture part of the lucrative full-size pickup truck market. Rumored for many years before, the 1993 Toyota T100 boasted a full-size (8 ft) pickup bed but retained the engine and suspension setup of its smaller and older sibling, the compact Toyota Pickup Truck Although the T100 was a bit larger than the competitive mid-size Dodge Dakota and compact Ford Ranger pickup trucks of the time, it was still much smaller than full-size American pickup trucks of the time. This gave the T100 a unique position and opportunity within the truck ranks. Though economical, reliable and practical, in the grand scheme of things the unsuccessful T100 had not captured as much of the market as Toyota had hoped. Many critics maintainedthe T100 was still too small, despite being larger than both the Toyota Pickup Truck and the Toyota Tacoma compact trucks, for the full-size segment.

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Toyota Supra

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The Toyota Supra is a sports car/grand tourer that was produced by Toyota Motor Corporation from 1978 to 2002. The styling of the Toyota Supra was derived from the Toyota Celica, but it was both longer and wider.  Starting in mid-1986, the Supra (in its third generation, Mark III) became its own model and was no longer based on the Celica. In turn, Toyota also stopped using the prefix Celica and began just calling the car Supra.  Owing to the similarity and past of the Celica’s name, it is frequently mistaken for the Supra, and vice versa. First, second and third generation Supras were assembled at Tahara plant in Tahara, Aichi while the MKIV Supra was assembled at the Motomachi plant in Toyota City.

The Supra also traces much of its roots back to the Toyota 2000GT with the main instance being its engine. The first three generations were offered with a direct descendant to the Toyota Crown’s and 2000GT’s M engine.  All four generations of Supra produced have an inline 6-cylinder engine.  Interior aspects were also similar, as was the chassis code “A”.

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Toyota Stout

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Modernized in March 1979, the 1.5-ton Stout now used the front pressings of the smaller Hilux but still fulfilled the same role as before. The bed used the same pressings as for the previous Stouts, meaning that there was a pronounced difference between the front and rear bodywork. The RK110 also continued to use the same 1,994 cc 5R engine, although export versions were also available with the 2.2 litre 20R engine.  The Stout underwent a light facelift in January 1982 and became the RK111.

Body styles included a pickup (two-door, three-seater) and a double-cab pickup (four-door six-seater). The Stout was discontinued in 1986 without a successor,as Toyota’s first full-size pickup, the T100 (as well as the later Tundra) were built mainly for North America, where the Stout had been replaced by the Hilux in 1968. In Japan, the third generation Stout saw very limited sales, as trucks in this weight class were nearly always of a cab-over design. Most third generation Stouts were exported.  The double cab version was retired in July 1985.  Stout production came to a final halt in March 1989,although there are indications that production continued until as late as 2000. These later versions (YK110) are supposed to have received the 4Y engine.

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